trolley-trail-press-release

Hyattsville CDC Installs Sculptural Wayfinding Kiosks along the Rhode Island Avenue Trolley Trail

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                 
Friday, July 6th, 2018
Contact:  Mary Imgrund, Hyattsville CDC
(301) 683-8267  mimgrund@hyattsvillecdc.org

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HYATTSVILLE, MD – The Hyattsville CDC completed its installation of three vibrant sculptures along the Rhode Island Avenue Trolley Trail to enhance the experience  of cyclists and pedestrians enjoying this unique heritage connector. The kiosks, designed by local artist Charles Bergen, have been installed in Hyattsville, Riverdale Park, and College Park. They include wayfinding maps developed by the CDC to orient trail users and identify amenities to be accessed and experienced in the vicinity of the trail.

Stuart Eisenberg, Executive Director of the CDC, cited the kiosks as part of their ARTways program. “We’re creating a foundation for a walkable community elevated by public art and functionality. By placing artworks along these popular trails, we can connect wayfaring travelers with the people, businesses, and cultural resources in these municipalities and in the Gateway Arts and Entertainment District,” he said.

Bikers and pedestrians can look forward to a cheerful greeting from these bright red and yellow sculptures laden with iconography drawn from the trail’s historic origin – the Rhode Island Ave Trolley system. Established before 1894 as a post road, the original streetcar rails ran from the Treasury Building in Washington D.C. to Laurel, MD. Industry popped up along its path and helped establish what we now know as the Route One Corridor.

The project helps to link the Anacostia River Trail network and Washington DC area trail riders with the Route One corridor communities: and required coordinating with and obtaining permissions from three municipalities, the Prince George’s County Department of Parks and Recreation, the Maryland State Highway Administration, Prince George’s County Department of Public Works & Transportation, and the University of Maryland. The CDC and the City of Hyattsville are currently working to bring two more of the sculptures to the southern end of the Trolley Trail. The CDC is now also working on other public art projects for the ARTways program that are slated to begin in late 2018 and will be placed within the Anacostia Stream Valley.

The Hyattsville CDC developed and installed its sculptural wayfinding kiosks with the financial support of grants from the Maryland Heritage Area Authority and the Prince George’s County Redevelopment Authority: and collaborated extensively with Maryland Milestones, Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission, and received the cooperation and support of the City of Hyattsville, Town of Riverdale Park, and City of College Park.

http://marylandmilestones.org/trolleytrail

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